Blog / Ford Foundation

Our response to The Chronicle of Philanthropy story about ZeroDivide

After a decade working to improve the news media, Renaissance Journalism finds itself as a subject of a news story. It’s about our efforts to track down and recover more than $600,000 in foundation funds that went missing. So far, it’s a story without an ending. The news article by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, "A Foundation Collapsed. Its Money Is Gone. What Happened Is Shrouded in Mystery," published on Sept. 12, 2019,  focuses on the collapse of ZeroDivide, a San Francisco-based nonprofit organization that worked on health and technology issues. Reporter Marc Gunther’s story asks how and why ZeroDivide, which started as a $50 million grantmaking foundation in 1998, reinvented itself into a grant-seeking nonprofit that eventually went broke in 2016. Renaissance Journalism became a part of the story because we had been operating as a fiscally sponsored project of ZeroDivide at the time.

Detroit Journalism Cooperative Tackles Race, Poverty and Power

Journalists from nine news outlets in Detroit have joined forces to tackle the trenchant issues of race, poverty and power that continue to hobble that city’s climb out of bankruptcy. Launched last week, the ambitious, seven-part series will continue with in-depth investigations and special reports contributed by journalists in a unique multiracial media collaboration called the Detroit Journalism Cooperative (DJC), which Renaissance Journalism helped to organize more than two years ago.

UPDATE: TAMPA BAY PULITZER PROJECT ADDED TO EQUITY MATTERS PROGRAM ON JUNE 3

Mark your calendars! On June 3, Renaissance Journalism is hosting a one-day symposium for journalists on educational equity. The event, "Equity Matters: Covering the Troubling Divide in the Education of America's Children," will bring together the nation’s top experts and leading education journalists in examining the root causes and impact of our nation’s troubling “opportunity gap.” This disparity has resulted in an unequal education system, shortchanging the futures of millions of low-income, minority and immigrant children.